I get by…with a little help from my friends

Toasty warm in a matching handcrafted set by my dear friend, Sarah.

It’s been a challenging year for all of us, and frankly I’m glad to see 2020 pass on by tonight. My prayer is that 2021 will be a better year for all of us. It can be if we lean in, strengthen our web of connections, and pay attention to life.

Living with a chronic and/or terminal condition can be a lonely, confusing, and difficult journey. Most folks are really good about responding to the initial crisis, but when it settles into weeks, months, or years of treatments, medical procedures and appointments, and life adjustments things can get complicated. It’s tough to know what to say or do when your family and/or friends are hurting. My advice? Each person’s situation and needs are different. But try. It’s better to be awkward and say the wrong thing than to say nothing at all or just slip out of contact.

For me the situation is two-fold. First, I don’t like to bother folks with my problems, and 2) it’s one of my growing edges to ask for and gratefully receive help. Thankfully, many good friends and my amazing extended family continue to pray and walk with me on this journey, and that makes all the difference in the world.

Last week I wore this new hat crafted by my friend, June.

When I see your posts and “likes” on Facebook in response to my blog entries or posts, it does wonders to pep me up and keep me going. When a card or note arrives in the mail, it’s a big boost. Why? I know that prayer works, community matters, and people care.

Recently I received gifts of beautiful handcrafted (and WARM) hats and accessories. When I wear the hats and scarves or when I cuddle under a gift blanket during chemo, I carry you with me, and I am blessed by your ministry of presence and caring. When I gaze on the beauty of flowers (a luxury I rarely allow myself to purchase), your love and care are right there. Yes, presence and caring; even though COVID is keeping us apart, it’s these tangible signs of your love and solidarity keep me bounding up that staircase at M.D. Anderson–Cooper on the wings of eagles to receive my chemo and fully and faithfully live another day.

A friend and colleague who is also undergoing cancer treatments sent me this awesome sticker that now graces the front of my treatment notebook. Thank you, Courtney! Not 2021 Cancer!

Right now, most cancer patients cannot even have someone accompany them for treatment/procedures in an effort to keep us from COVID exposure. Little things like notes, texts, and practical expressions of love and support–like warm hats and socks and kind encouraging words–stand in for the lack of face-to-face time with friends and family.

On this last night of 2020, I want to thank all of you for the many ways you have lifted my spirits, augmented my courage, and kept me strong during a particularly grueling few months. I love you all and am so grateful to be a part of this wider, stronger web of connection that just continues to ripple across the cosmos. To my many friends, family, and colleagues who are living with chronic and terminal conditions, please know that I hold you in daily prayer. We are all stronger together, and don’t forget: We all get by with a little help from our friends. Thank you! Happy New (and better, please) Year!

Love your liver

I must admit that I’ve never been a big fan of liver. Maybe it goes back to having to eat it as a child, once even cleverly disguised as country fried steak (no amount of breading and gravy can hide that distinctive taste). The only way I can stomach it is all jazzed up as pate.

Image: Wikimedia Commons

While I may never love liver, I am learning to love my own liver. I never gave it much thought until I was diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer. Then I began to understand just how important this strange looking organ is as I watched various numbers on my lab reports start to go haywire this past summer, things on my comprehensive metabolic panel like alkaline phosphatase, ALT, and AST. What followed was a series of tests to try to figure out what was going on: a liver biopsy, an MRI, a PET/CT, and a triphasic CT. The PET/CT and triphasic CT finally revealed the presence of metastatic liver lesions.

This would explain the sudden weight loss, the inability to digest my food fully, the presence of repeated plural effusions and ascites. Within a span of days I went from walking four or five miles a day to barely being able to walk up the stairs. It was scary stuff. Add to the physical issues the fact that we were also moving to a new state and had to get a house on the market and packed up. Yikes!

Fortunately my new oncologist wasn’t overly worried and felt that the chemo we already had planned to address the rising cancer markers would also address the liver mets. And if it doesn’t, he told me, there are other ways to address them. So while what was a minor bump in the road turned into a pothole of sizable proportions, it is nowhere near the end of the road. My markers have come down significantly after only one cycle of Abraxane, and my liver numbers are stable or dropping. Whew! Come on little yew tree with your bound protein molecule, do your thing to bring this body back into balance.

Image: Wikimedia Commons

What’s the point of this post? Learn to love your liver now–before you are diagnosed with liver mets and/or stage four cancer. Begin an anti-cancer lifestyle now and take care to the best of your ability of your body for you are fearfully and wonderfully made. Whether you love liver and onions or despise the stuff, well, that’s your call.

Check out these facts about your liver and read more about this fascinating organ here:

  1. Largest glandular organ – Our liver is the largest glandular organ of the human body and the second largest organ besides our skin.
  2. Multifunctional – Our liver simultaneously performs over 200 important functions for the body. Some of these important functions include supplying glucose to the brain, combating infections, and storing nutrients.
  3. It contains fat – 10% of our liver is made up of fat. If the fat content in the liver goes above 10% it is considered a “fatty liver” and makes you more likely to develop type 2 diabetes.
  4. It stocks iron – Our liver stores important vitamins and nutrients from the food we eat and stocks them up for when we need them later.
  5. Detoxifier – Our liver detoxifies the harmful things we take in like alcohol and drugs. Without the liver the body cannot process these items.
  6. Creator of blood – The liver creates the blood that circulates in our bodies. In fact, the liver starts producing blood before we are born. Without the liver there would be no blood and no life.
  7. It regenerates – Our liver has the amazing ability to regenerate itself, making liver transplant possible. When people donate half their liver, the remaining part of the liver regenerates the section that was removed.