Tag Archives: Jr.

Life on Loan

Treat the earth well: it was not given to you by your parents, it was loaned to you by your children. We do not inherit the Earth from our Ancestors, we borrow it from our Children. — Native American Proverb

The earth is the Lord’s and all that is in it, the world, and those who live in it… — Psalm 24:1

“You’re not in charge!” Most human beings I know chafe under such an imperative statement. Sure we’re in charge, each one of us, right? Do you remember the Bon Jovi song “It’s my Life” and its siren song to individuality: “It’s my life/It’s now or never/I ain’t gonna live forever/I just wanna live while I’m alive…”? This song has inspired people of all ages and become an anthem to the idea of controlling one’s own life and destiny.

It’s true that we don’t live forever on this earth, and it’s laudable to desire to really live instead of go through the motion, but it is not true that this life is ours to do with as we please. Our life is a loan. We didn’t dictate our birth , and we’re really not completely in charge of our terminus post quem. And what we do while we’re here–every choice and decision–matters and affects the course of our journey.

Our choices and life paths also affect others, an important point to ponder. How we treat our bodies affects how long we may potentially live, how much we will have to invest in health care, and what our quality of life will be. How we treat our economic resources affects our security, the futures of those we love, and even the future of our community and our nation. How we treat our earth may potentially affect everyone. We are, in effect, “borrowing” the earth and all its resources from future generations.

Yes, we live on borrowed time with lives that are merely a loan. Each breath, each day, everything is pure gift, but the gift is shared. Our gift of life is lived out in community for good or for ill. How will you enjoy your gift, steward your loan, and care for what is not yours forever?

Thanks-Living Action:

1. Ask yourself what kind of world you would like to see for your children or your children’s children. If you do not have children of your own, what kind of world would you like to leave as your legacy?

2. How can you be a better steward of your time, talent, and resources?

3. What does it mean to live life as gift?

Finally, ponder these words from a sermon delivered by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. at the Ebenezer Baptist Church:

“It really boils down to this: that all life is interrelated. We are all caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied into a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly. … This is the way our universe is structured, this is its interrelated quality. We aren’t going to have peace on Earth until we recognize this basic fact of the interrelated structure of all reality.”

Photo by Damanhur, Federation of Communities. Thanks!

Longest Night

The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness did not overcome it. — John 1:5

Read:  John 1:1-9, 14

Ponder:

“Darkness cannot drive out darkness: only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate: only love can do that.” — Martin Luther King, Jr.

Reflect:

Well, the world didn’t end today. Surprise! Surprise! It was the winter solstice, the longest night of the year in the Northern Hemisphere. Here in south central Pennsylvania it was a chilly, gray day complete with a few snow flurries. Night settled in all too fast, and the wind has been howling through the screens ever since.

The good news is that in a few hours, dawn will break. It may be another gray winter day, but the promise of shorter nights and warmer days begins tomorrow. The darkness will never permanently be with us. There is always hope and light and love.

Thanks-Living:

Give thanks for the light. Do something today to spread a little light and a little love. It can be as simple as a smile or as generous as a gift of time or resources. You know the needs; you can be that light.

Photo by Balaji Dutt. Thanks!

Be Kind

He has told you, O mortal, what is good; and what does the Lord require of you but to do justice, and to love kindness, and to walk humbly with your God? — Micah 6:8 (NRSV)

The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice. — Martin Luther King, Jr. 1968

Today, November 13, is World Kindness Day. Click here to learn more about the movement’s history and intent. I am thankful for this timely reminder about the importance of kindness in our world–on all  levels.

If you live in the United States, and unless you are completely off-grid and out-of-touch, you’ve heard some of the shrill cries and seen the petty accusations being hurled cavalierly about in cyberspace and in the media. It never fails to amaze me how absolutely awfully we can treat one another in our quest to be “right.”

I have seen some of the ugliest, mean-spirited, vitriolic memes and posts on Facebook in the past weeks and months, not to be outdone, of course, by some terribly toxic tweets. Good and faithful folk were sputtering and clattering like pressure cookers about to blow. Most assuredly it would seem that our country is headed straight off a real (not just fiscal) cliff in a metaphorical hand basket accompanied by the cranked-up strains of AC/DC’s “Highway to Hell.”

Thankfully, things are never as dire as the pundits and extremists would have us believe, and I strongly believe that the powers of good will always prevail. Sure, there’s trouble in River City–and just about everywhere else–but there’s a lot of really good stuff happening, too. You just have to look for it because you probably will not see it on the evening news.

All major world religions stress kindness as an attribute to which adherents should aspire. It may be expressed in different words or ways, but the message is clear. We are to treat one another with lovingkindness. We are to love our neighbors–both those we agree with and those we find abhorrent. I’ve included one of my favorite passages of scripture and a favorite quote. Yes, the arc of the moral universe does indeed bend toward justice, and kindness is the weight that helps us bend toward justice and a better world for all.

When we are kind to one another, we see each other through more compassionate eyes. We are more willing to listen, and not just listen but really hear and empathize with one another. When we are kind, we see a fellow human, a beloved child of the Creator, and one whose journey is equally as valid as our own rather than an opponent who is to be squashed like a stink bug.

So, dear reader, how have you practiced kindness today? What one small thing can you do to reach across a divide and make a difference? How can you accomplish one small thing to help heal this beautiful yet broken world?

Blessings on your continued thanks-living journey!

PS: Don’t forget to comment if you want to have your own copy of I’ve got Some Lovin’ to Do, Volume One of The Doris Diaries, edited by Julia Park Tracey.

Photos by ~maja*majika and sweetonveg. Thanks!