I shouldn’t be writing this, but I am…

so please keep those positive thoughts and fervent prayers going! They truly do matter and make a difference.

Image: Gebet, Prayer, Kurt Stocker, Creative Commons License

My liver has been quite uncooperative of late. Actually, my oncologist now thinks the liver has been involved all along since my initial diagnosis included a large pleural effusion and ascites. The taxol and abraxane and Ibrance have just kept things in pretty good check. Fortunately, the ascites has not returned (knocking furiously on my noggin), but the pleural effusion has been a periodic and unwelcome visitor.

If you saw my last post, you will note that we’ve taken more aggressive action with a PleurX catheter and a change in chemo cocktails. The Abraxane was working beautifully until one day it just took a nasty turn in the wrong direction. It happened fast, too! I remember telling Dr. Mehta when we started Abraxane that it would either work well or it would annoy the cancer. The latter is the path the cancer took, so we started last month on Gemzar (gembicitine). This is a rather old chemo drug as such things go, and it has the potential for some nasty side effects, but it also has the potential to reverse this trend. So bring it on, Gemzar. Let’s sparkle and glitter like a pink unicorn and send these micro liver lesions and the accompanying inflammation into apoptosis!

It is a scary time for Rob and me because last Tuesday, based on my labs, Dr. Mehta was ready to have a very different conversation with us. Yet he admitted that my clinical presentation did not match my labs. My bilirubin is climbing–this week 16.5, but my alk phos levels are falling some. I don’t look as jaundiced as I should be, and I have enough energy to walk a mile or two (albeit slowly) and climb three flights of stairs. I’m not confused, and my appetite is improving. My symptoms of being a lovely shade of yellow and itching like a dog with fleas are manageable. It doesn’t make medical sense, but Dr. Mehta says he has seen this happen a couple of times before. So here’s to medical anomalies and miracles.

Image: A Bouquet of Prayers, Ajay Goel, Creative Commons License

Friends, the only thing to which I can attribute all this is my faith in the cosmic Christ, the one who holds every atom and molecule of the universe together, and who hears our fervent prayers. Sure medical science helps, and these tools have been given to us by God and healing hands raised up in divine power. Whether one identifies as Christian, a practitioner of any of the world’s religions, or someone who simply believes in the connectedness and sacredness of all creation, we are all on the same page when it comes to desiring wellness and wholeness for ourselves, for one another, and for creation.

So thank you! Thank you for your ongoing prayers, good intentions, and many kindnesses. They keep me going. They lift me up. The allow the glory of God to be shown through this process. Thank you.

I do have some specific prayer requests if you are able: 1) please add me to any and all prayers lists at your houses of worship; 2) I would seek specific prayers for the cancer to cooperate and exit my body; 3) that the divine will for my life will be realized; and 4) that although I am not afraid to die to this life, that I will be given more time to live, laugh, and love. Above all, I pray that Christ will be glorified in, by, and through whatever wholeness, healing, and life there is to come. Thank you! To God be all the glory. Amen.

Image: Prayers at Western Wall Temple Mount in Jerusalem, Asim Bharwani, Creative Commons License

Finally, friends, treasure each precious day of life you have. The present is all any of us is truly guaranteed. So live boldly, love lavishly, and make this world a better place for all people with all that you can.

Love your liver

I must admit that I’ve never been a big fan of liver. Maybe it goes back to having to eat it as a child, once even cleverly disguised as country fried steak (no amount of breading and gravy can hide that distinctive taste). The only way I can stomach it is all jazzed up as pate.

Image: Wikimedia Commons

While I may never love liver, I am learning to love my own liver. I never gave it much thought until I was diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer. Then I began to understand just how important this strange looking organ is as I watched various numbers on my lab reports start to go haywire this past summer, things on my comprehensive metabolic panel like alkaline phosphatase, ALT, and AST. What followed was a series of tests to try to figure out what was going on: a liver biopsy, an MRI, a PET/CT, and a triphasic CT. The PET/CT and triphasic CT finally revealed the presence of metastatic liver lesions.

This would explain the sudden weight loss, the inability to digest my food fully, the presence of repeated plural effusions and ascites. Within a span of days I went from walking four or five miles a day to barely being able to walk up the stairs. It was scary stuff. Add to the physical issues the fact that we were also moving to a new state and had to get a house on the market and packed up. Yikes!

Fortunately my new oncologist wasn’t overly worried and felt that the chemo we already had planned to address the rising cancer markers would also address the liver mets. And if it doesn’t, he told me, there are other ways to address them. So while what was a minor bump in the road turned into a pothole of sizable proportions, it is nowhere near the end of the road. My markers have come down significantly after only one cycle of Abraxane, and my liver numbers are stable or dropping. Whew! Come on little yew tree with your bound protein molecule, do your thing to bring this body back into balance.

Image: Wikimedia Commons

What’s the point of this post? Learn to love your liver now–before you are diagnosed with liver mets and/or stage four cancer. Begin an anti-cancer lifestyle now and take care to the best of your ability of your body for you are fearfully and wonderfully made. Whether you love liver and onions or despise the stuff, well, that’s your call.

Check out these facts about your liver and read more about this fascinating organ here:

  1. Largest glandular organ – Our liver is the largest glandular organ of the human body and the second largest organ besides our skin.
  2. Multifunctional – Our liver simultaneously performs over 200 important functions for the body. Some of these important functions include supplying glucose to the brain, combating infections, and storing nutrients.
  3. It contains fat – 10% of our liver is made up of fat. If the fat content in the liver goes above 10% it is considered a “fatty liver” and makes you more likely to develop type 2 diabetes.
  4. It stocks iron – Our liver stores important vitamins and nutrients from the food we eat and stocks them up for when we need them later.
  5. Detoxifier – Our liver detoxifies the harmful things we take in like alcohol and drugs. Without the liver the body cannot process these items.
  6. Creator of blood – The liver creates the blood that circulates in our bodies. In fact, the liver starts producing blood before we are born. Without the liver there would be no blood and no life.
  7. It regenerates – Our liver has the amazing ability to regenerate itself, making liver transplant possible. When people donate half their liver, the remaining part of the liver regenerates the section that was removed.